The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Proposes to Downlist the Status of the Wood Stork from Endangered to Threatened

On Tuesday, December 18, 2012, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) proposed upgrading the status of the wood stork (Mycteria americana) from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  The proposed change is in response to improvements in the population and habitat of the species based on the best available scientific information.

Dan Ashe, Director for the Service, remarked that the proposed reclassification "demonstrates that the [ESA] works" and that "the species is making real progress toward recovery."  The wood stork was originally listed (pdf) as endangered in 1984; since that time, the breeding population has substantially improved.  Specifically, the average number of nesting pairs has increased from 7,086 to 8,996 over the last decade.  While these nesting benchmarks are still below the five-year average of 10,000 needed for delisting, the population increase is encouraging.  The wood stork's breeding range has also expanded to twice its former size.  The species used to breed primarily in central and southern Florida, but its current breeding range includes wetland areas in Georgia and South Carolina.

The proposed reclassification will not affect any protective or conservation measures in place for the species under the ESA.  Rather, it recognizes the improvements in the wood stork's population and is intended to encourage the continuation of collaborative conservation efforts, with the ultimate goal of delisting the species in the coming years.

 



  • Associate

    Katrina (Diaz) Wu is an eminent domain and real estate litigation attorney focusing primarily on eminent domain, inverse condemnation, tort, regulatory takings, and real estate and business valuation matters.  Katrina also ...

Nossaman’s Endangered Species Law & Policy blog focuses on news, events, and policies affecting endangered species issues in California and throughout the United States. Topics include listing and critical habitat decisions, conservation and recovery planning, inter-agency consultation, and related developments in law, policy, and science. We also inform readers about regulatory and legislative developments, as well as key court decisions.

Stay Connected

RSS RSS Feed

Categories

Archives

View All Nossaman Blogs
Jump to Page

We use cookies on this website to improve functionality, enhance performance, analyze website traffic and to enable social media features.  To learn more, please see our Privacy Policy and our Terms & Conditions for additional detail.